ocean movements

deep currents

Currents also flow deep below the surface of the ocean. Deep currents are caused by differences in density at the top and bottom. Density is defined as the amount of mass per unit of volume. More dense water takes up less space than less dense water. It has the same mass but less volume. Water that is more dense sinks. Less dense water rises. What can make water more dense? Water becomes more dense when it is colder and when it has more salt. In the North Atlantic Ocean, cold winds chill the water at the surface. Sea ice grows in this cold water, but ice is created from fresh water. The salt is left behind in the seawater. This cold, salty water is very dense, so it sinks to the bottom of the North Atlantic. Downwelling can take place in other places where surface water becomes very dense (see Figure 14.17). When water sinks it pushes deep water along at the bottom of the ocean. This water circulates through all of the ocean basins in deep currents.

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upwelling

Sometimes deep ocean water rises to the surface. This is called upwelling. Figure 14.18 shows why it happens. Strong winds blow surface water away from shore. This allows deeper water to flow to the surface and take its place. When water comes up from the deep, it brings a lot of nutrients with it. Why is deep water so full of nutrients? Over time, dead organisms and other organic matter settle to the bottom water and collect. The nutrient-rich water that comes to the surface by upwelling supports many living things.

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surface currents and climate

Large ocean currents can have a big impact on the climate of nearby coasts. The Gulf Stream, for example, carries warm water from near the equator up the eastern coast of North America. Look at the map in Figure 14.16. It shows how the Gulf Stream warms both the water and land along the coast.

coriolis effect

Winds and surface currents tend to move from the hot equator north or south toward the much cooler poles. Thats because of differences in the temperature of air masses over Earths surface. But Earth is spinning on its axis underneath the wind and water as they move. The Earth rotates from west to east. As a result, winds and currents actually end up moving toward the northeast or southeast. This effect of Earths rotation on the direction of winds and currents is called the Coriolis effect.

why tides occur

Figure 14.13 shows why tides occur. The main cause of tides is the pull of the Moons gravity on Earth. The pull is greatest on whatever is closest to the Moon. Although the gravity pulls the land, only the water can move. As a result: Water on the side of Earth facing the Moon is pulled hardest by the Moons gravity. This causes a bulge of water on that side of Earth. That bulge is a high tide. Earth itself is pulled harder by the Moons gravity than is the ocean on the side of Earth opposite the Moon. As a result, there is bulge of water on the opposite side of Earth. This creates another high tide. With water bulging on two sides of Earth, theres less water left in between. This creates low tides on the other two sides of the planet.

tides

Tides are daily changes in the level of ocean water. They occur all around the globe. High tides occur when the water reaches its highest level in a day. Low tides occur when the water reaches its lowest level in a day. Tides keep cycling from high to low and back again. In most places the water level rises and falls twice a day. So there are two high tides and two low tides approximately every 24 hours. In Figure 14.12, you can see the difference between high and low tides. This is called the tidal range.

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surface currents

Another way ocean water moves is in currents. A current is a stream of moving water that flows through the ocean. Surface currents are caused mainly by winds, but not the winds that blow and change each day. Surface currents are caused by the major wind belts that blow in the same direction all the time. The major surface currents are shown in Figure 14.15. They flow in a clockwise direction in the Northern Hemi- sphere. In the Southern Hemisphere, they flow in the opposite direction.

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spring tides and neap tides

The Suns gravity also pulls on Earth and its oceans. Even though the Sun is much larger than the Moon, the pull of the Suns gravity is much less because the Sun is much farther away. The Suns gravity strengthens or weakens the Moons influence on tides. Figure 14.14 shows the position of the Moon relative to the Sun at different times during the month. The positions of the Moon and Sun relative to each other determines how the Sun affects tides. This creates spring tides or neap tides. Spring tides occur during the new moon and full moon. The Sun and Moon are in a straight line either on the same side of Earth or on opposite sides. Their gravitational pull combines to cause very high and very low tides. Spring tides have the greatest tidal range. Neap tides occur during the first and third quarters of the Moon. The Moon and Sun are at right angles to each other. Their gravity pulls on the oceans in different directions so the highs and lows are not as great. Neap tides have the smallest tidal range. This animation shows the effect of the Moon and Sun on the tides:

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the size of waves

Figure 14.9 also shows how the size of waves is measured. The highest point of a wave is the crest. The lowest point is the trough. The vertical distance between a crest and a trough is the height of the wave. Wave height is also called amplitude. The horizontal distance between two crests is the wavelength. Both amplitude and wavelength are measures of wave size. The size of an ocean wave depends on how fast, over how great a distance, and how long the wind blows. The greater each of these factors is, the bigger a wave will be. Some of the biggest waves occur with hurricanes. A hurricane is a storm that forms over the ocean. Its winds may blow more than 150 miles per hour! The winds also travel over long distances and may last for many days.

waves

Most ocean waves are caused by winds. A wave is the transfer of energy through matter. A wave that travels across miles of ocean is traveling energy, not water. Ocean waves transfer energy from wind through water. The energy of a wave may travel for thousands of miles. The water itself moves very little. Figure 14.9 shows how water molecules move when a wave goes by.

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tsunamis

Not all waves are caused by winds. A shock to the ocean can also send waves through water. A tsunami is a wave or set of waves that is usually caused by an earthquake. As we have seen in recent years, the waves can be enormous and extremely destructive. Usually tsunami waves travel through the ocean unnoticed. But when they reach the shore they become enormous. Tsunami waves can flood entire regions. They destroy property and cause many deaths. Figure 14.11 shows the damage caused by a tsunami in the Indian Ocean in 2004.

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breaking waves

Figure 14.10 shows what happens to waves near shore. As waves move into shallow water, they start to touch the bottom. The base of the waves drag and slow. Soon the waves slow down and pile up. They get steeper and unstable as the top moves faster than the base. When they reach the shore, the waves topple over and break.

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instructional diagrams

description_image

The diagram shows the relationship between the moon and tides around Earth. Tides are daily changes in the level of ocean water. They occur all around the globe. High tides occur when the water reaches its highest level in a day. Low tides occur when the water reaches its lowest level in a day. Tides keep cycling from high to low and back again. The main cause of tides is the pull of the Moons gravity on Earth. The pull is the greatest on whatever is closest to the Moon. Although the gravity pulls the land, only the water can move. As a result, a tidal bulge (high tide) is formed due to gravity. Earth itself is pulled harder by the Moons gravity than is the ocean on the side of Earth opposite the Moon. As a result, there is a tidal bulge of water on the opposite side of Earth due to inertia. This creates another high tide. With water bulging on two sides of Earth, there's less water left in between. This creates low tides on the other two sides of the planet.

description_image

This diagram illustrates the components and behavior of a wave propagating through water. The highest point in a wave is called the Crest, whereas the lowest point is called the Trough. Waves are periodic, meaning they maintain the same pattern as they propagate. The distance from one crest to another is called the Wavelength. The wavelength can also be measured from any point in the wave to the next point at the same elevation. Beneath the wave crests, water molecules tend to move in an orbital path. Two important properties of a wave are its Frequency and Period. The frequency of a wave is related to how fast the wave is moving. Frequency is defined as the number of times a particular point in a wave, say a crest, passes by a given point each second. Period is defined as the time it takes for a wave to move through one wavelength or cycle.

description_image

This diagram represents the different positions of the Sun and moon in relation to the Earth, with two different types of tides. The positions of the Sun and moon affect tides, because the Sun's gravity determines how much influence the moon has on tides. Spring tides occur during new moon and full moon, because the Sun and moon are in a straight line, and their combined gravity causes extreme tides on Earth (high or low). Neap tides happen when the moon is in 1st quarter or third quarter, because since the Sun and moon are not in line here, the gravity is weaker and the tides do not have as great of a range. So, spring tides and neap tides are essentially opposite concepts. As you can see in Diagram A, the light blue area around the Earth represents the amount of tide, and there are extreme highs and lows. In Diagram B, the light blue area is more averaged out around the globe.

description_image

This is a diagram showing how a mechanical wave moves. The wave travels in the direction from A to B. The number of waves that pass point A in one second is called wave frequency. The time is takes for a wave crest to pass point A and reach point B is called the wave period. The distance from point A to point B is a wavelength, which measures the crest of the first wave to the crest of the second. The trough is the low point of the wave, and the crest is the high point. There are three types of mechanical waves that move through a medium: transverse, longitudinal, and surface.

description_image

This image shows how spring tide occurs, a tide just after a new or full moon, when there is the greatest difference between high and low water. The times and amplitude of tides at a locale are influenced by the alignment of the Sun and Moon. Approximately twice a month, around new moon and full moon when the Sun, Moon, and Earth from a line, the tidal force due to the sun reinforces that due to the Moon. The tide's range is then at its maximum; this is called the spring tide.

questions

What is the primary cause of the tides?

a. Earths rotation

-->  b. The moons gravity

c. the Suns gravity

d. wind

Surface currents

a. are caused by Coriolis effect

b. flow in a counterclockwise direction in the Northern Hemisphere

c. are caused by winds that may have blown far from the current

-->  d. none of these

Where in the ocean is wave energy the greatest?

-->  a. at the surface

b. at the ocean floor

c. half way between the surface and the ocean floor

d. None of the above

A wave breaks because

a. the base has friction with the bottom

b. it becomes too tall to be supported by its base

c. it reaches the shore

-->  d. all of these

Upwelling brings

a. warm water to the surface so there are coral reefs

b. cold water east to west across the Pacific

-->  c. nutrients to the surface so there is a lot of life

d. none of these

The highest point of a wave is its amplitude.

a. true

-->  b. false

Wavelength is the difference between a crest and a trough.

a. true

-->  b. false

The biggest ocean waves occur with hurricanes.

-->  a. true

b. false

The greatest cause of tides is the Sun.

a. true

-->  b. false

Waves break on shore because the water is shallow.

-->  a. true

b. false

Tides are waves: high tide is the crest and low tide is the trough.

-->  a. true

b. false

All waves are caused by winds.

a. true

-->  b. false

Tides cause water levels to rise and fall once a day.

a. true

-->  b. false

A wave is a transfer of energy that initially began with wind.

-->  a. true

b. false

The difference between high and low tides is the tidal range.

-->  a. true

b. false

The first sign of a tsunami is coming is high water moving fast across the ocean.

a. true

-->  b. false

Coriolis effect is caused by Earths rotation.

-->  a. true

b. false

The suns gravity is the main cause of Earths tides.

a. true

-->  b. false

Spring tides occur when the sun and moon are in a straight line.

-->  a. true

b. false

The Coriolis effect causes surface currents to flow diagonally across the ocean.

-->  a. true

b. false

There two high tides and two low tides every

-->  a. day.

b. week.

c. month.

d. year.

The main cause of tides is

a. differences in water density.

b. prevailing winds.

c. Coriolis effect

-->  d. gravity.

Neap tides occur when the sun and moon are

a. lined up with each other.

-->  b. at right angles to each other.

c. on opposite sides of Earth from each other.

d. none of the above

Spring tides have the

a. highest low tide.

-->  b. greatest tidal range.

c. least difference between high and low tides.

d. two of the above

The Gulf Stream is a(n)

a. river in Florid

b. area of upwelling.

c. deep ocean current.

-->  d. surface ocean current.

Which of the following statements about upwelling is false?

a. Upwelling brings a lot of nutrients to the surface.

b. Many organisms live in an area where upwelling occurs.

-->  c. Upwelling occurs where wind blows surface water toward shore.

d. none of the above

Ocean water is denser when it is

a. warmer.

b. colder.

c. saltier.

-->  d. two of the above

daily change in the level of ocean water

a. upwelling

b. neap tide

-->  c. tide

d. spring tide

e. wave

f. density

g. current

stream of moving water that flows through the ocean

a. upwelling

b. neap tide

c. tide

d. spring tide

e. wave

f. density

-->  g. current

tide that occurs during the first or third quarter of the moon

a. upwelling

-->  b. neap tide

c. tide

d. spring tide

e. wave

f. density

g. current

transfer of energy through matter

a. upwelling

b. neap tide

c. tide

d. spring tide

-->  e. wave

f. density

g. current

tide that occurs during a full moon or new moon

a. upwelling

b. neap tide

c. tide

-->  d. spring tide

e. wave

f. density

g. current

movement of deep ocean water to the surface

-->  a. upwelling

b. neap tide

c. tide

d. spring tide

e. wave

f. density

g. current

amount of mass per unit of volume

a. upwelling

b. neap tide

c. tide

d. spring tide

e. wave

-->  f. density

g. current

diagram questions

question_image

From the diagram please identify the label that refers to the wave's height.

a. P

b. R

-->  c. K

d. A

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Which label represents the height?

a. R

-->  b. K

c. D

d. X

question_image

Is the distance between identical points in the adjacent cycles of a waveform signal?

a. E

b. X

c. K

-->  d. P

question_image

Which label refers to the trough?

-->  a. L

b. M

c. X

d. E

question_image

Which letter indicates wavelength?

a. X

b. E

c. T

-->  d. M

question_image

Identify the trough in this picture

a. P

b. X

c. A

-->  d. Y

question_image

Which letter represents the Crest?

a. Y

b. A

c. P

-->  d. X

question_image

Which label shows the Trough?

a. K

-->  b. N

c. L

d. Y

question_image

Which letter represents the Trough?

a. E

b. L

c. Y

-->  d. N

question_image

By what letter is the wavelength represented in the diagram?

a. D

b. U

-->  c. C

d. S

question_image

Where is the wave length?

a. U

-->  b. C

c. AT THE END

d. D

question_image

Identify the spring tide in this picture

a. H

b. W

-->  c. E

d. K

question_image

Which labels refers to the neap tide?

a. K & E

b. W & K

c. W & E

-->  d. W & H

question_image

The tide with the smallest tidal range.

-->  a. H

b. E

c. W

d. K

question_image

This diagram appears to show the phases of what?

a. STAR

b. EARTH

-->  c. MOON

d. SUN

question_image

Which label indicates a full moon?

a. L

b. F

-->  c. S

d. H

question_image

Which label refers to the spring tide?

-->  a. C

b. M

c. J

d. V

question_image

In the first diagram, what comes between J(Earth) and M(Sun)?

-->  a. F

b. V

c. L

d. H

question_image

Which letter corresponds to where the moon is able to cause neap tides?

-->  a. H

b. F

c. D

d. S

question_image

Identify the moon at third quarter

a. W

-->  b. F

c. X

d. N

question_image

Identify the new moon in this picture

a. W

b. H

-->  c. X

d. F

question_image

What tide is the sun at H?

a. NEAP TIDE

-->  b. SPRING TIDE

c. HIGH TIDE

d. LOW TIDE

question_image

Where is the new moon?

a. H

b. N

-->  c. X

d. F

question_image

Identify U

-->  a. MOON

b. OCEAN

c. SOLAR SYSTEM

d. EARTH

question_image

What does label U depict in this image of tides?

a. SUN

b. EARTH

c. OCEAN

-->  d. MOON

question_image

Which labels mark high tide?

a. F AND W

-->  b. N AND H

c. W AND H

d. N AND F

question_image

Which labels refer to the low tide?

a. F AND H

-->  b. F AND W

c. N AND H

d. D AND U

question_image

Celestial body that causes high and low tides due to its gravitational pull on earth

a. F

b. N

-->  c. D

d. W

question_image

Identify the North pole in the picture

a. H

-->  b. F

c. W

d. N

question_image

Identify the ocean

-->  a. C

b. U

c. W

d. L

question_image

In the image below Which letter represents the Earth's rotation?

a. C

-->  b. U

c. W

d. L

question_image

Which letter is showing earth's rotation?

a. C

b. W

-->  c. U

d. L

question_image

What is W in the figure?

a. MOON

b. EARTH

c. OCEAN

-->  d. TIDAL BUDGE OFFSET

question_image

Which label represents the sun in the first diagram?

a. C

b. A

-->  c. X

d. D

question_image

Which label shows the Earth's Rotation?

a. C

b. J

c. L

-->  d. E

question_image

What label identifies the Ecuador?

a. T

-->  b. C

c. S

d. L

question_image

Which letter represents the impact that the moon has on earth's tides?

a. L

b. J

c. S

-->  d. T

question_image

Identify low tide

-->  a. T&F

b. T&F

c. P&L

d. C&X

question_image

Which labels stand for low tide?

a. T AND L

b. P AND L

c. P AND F

-->  d. T AND F

question_image

Which represents a high tide?

a. X

b. P & L

-->  c. T & F

d. C

question_image

Which label refers to the equator?

a. S

b. C

c. L

-->  d. X

question_image

Which label shows the Mean Sea Level?

a. A

b. C

c. S

-->  d. V

question_image

Which line is referred to the mean sea level?

-->  a. V

b. C

c. X

d. A

question_image

Which label shows the Gravitational Force of the Moon?

-->  a. Y

b. N

c. D

d. E

question_image

Which letter refers to the high tide?

a. Y

b. N

c. L

-->  d. D

question_image

Which letter represents the moon?

a. K

-->  b. E

c. Y

d. L

question_image

What is the part of the diagram represented with the letter X?

a. MOON

b. SUN

-->  c. TIDAL BULGE

d. EARTH

question_image

Which label shows the sun?

a. X

-->  b. R

c. K

d. O

question_image

What does L represent?

a. Amplitude

b. Crest

-->  c. Wavelength

d. Trough

question_image

What is the vertical distance between a crest and a trough of a wave referred to as in the diagram?

a. Wavelength

-->  b. Height

c. Sine wave

d. Amplitude

question_image

What will happen to the water level if the height of the wave increases?

a. it will decrease

b. it will decrease then increase

c. it will remain constant

-->  d. it will also increase

question_image

What does B illustrate?

a. Wave

b. Trough

c. Sea level

-->  d. Crest

question_image

Which of the following is the measurement between crests?

a. Trough

b. Direction of travel

-->  c. Wave length

d. Wave height

question_image

How could the wave height be calculated?

a. By measuring the distance between the crests of the wave

-->  b. By measuring the distance between the through and the crest of the wave.

c. By dividing the distance of the wave and the wave period

d. By measuring the distance between the throughs of the wave

question_image

Which part of the wave is located below calm sea level?

a. Direction of Travel

b. Wave Length

-->  c. Trough

d. Crest

question_image

If wavelength of the wave increases what would happen to wave period?

a. doesn't change at all

b. not enough information

-->  c. increases

d. decreases

question_image

Identify the point on a wave with the maximum value or upward displacement within a cycle.

a. Orbital

-->  b. Crest

c. Gravity

d. Trough

question_image

How many circular motion was created by the waves travel in the illustration?

-->  a. 2

b. 3

c. 4

d. 1

question_image

Which one is the highest point of the wave?

a. Wavelength

b. Still-Water Level

c. Trough

-->  d. Crest

question_image

What is the diagram about?

a. Characteristics of Solar

b. Characteristics of Plants

-->  c. Characteristics of Waves

d. Characteristics of Energy

question_image

How many wave crests are shown in the figure?

a. 2

-->  b. 4

c. 3

d. 5

question_image

From which two points would you measure the wave to determine the height of the wave?

a. trough and still water level

b. crest and crest

-->  c. Still water level and crest

d. trough and crest

question_image

What is the part of the wave called that's below still-water level?

a. wavelength

b. apogee

c. crest

-->  d. trough

question_image

The wave length is measured:

a. By the wave height.

b. Trough to crest.

-->  c. Crest to crest.

d. Crest to trough.

question_image

How many crests does the wave in the diagram have?

a. 3

b. 4

c. 1

-->  d. 2

question_image

If the steepness ratio was higher the trough would be?

a. Not enough information to know

-->  b. Lower

c. Higher

d. The same

question_image

What do you call the lowest part of a wave?

a. wave height

b. steepness

-->  c. trough

d. crest

question_image

The diagram has how many crests?

a. 1

-->  b. 3

c. 2

d. 4

question_image

What is the area between the sea level and the crest called?

-->  a. amplitude

b. wave height

c. trough

d. wavelength

question_image

What is the name of the distance between wavelengths?

-->  a. Trough

b. Wave Height

c. Crest

d. Wave Length

question_image

What letter represents the wave height?

-->  a. H

b. L

c. C

d. T

question_image

How many waves are shown in the diagram?

-->  a. 2

b. 3

c. 1

d. 5

question_image

These are the high points of the wave.

a. Trough

b. Wavelength

c. Height

-->  d. Crest

question_image

What is the distance between crests called?

a. frequency

b. trough

c. oscillation

-->  d. wavelength

question_image

What is the distance between the wave height?

a. calm sea

b. amplitude

-->  c. wave length

d. crest

question_image

How many wave crests do we see here?

-->  a. 2

b. 1

c. 3

d. 4

question_image

How many tides are there?

a. 3

b. 1

c. 4

-->  d. 2

question_image

How many types of tide are shown in the picture?

a. 2

b. 6

c. 8

-->  d. 4

question_image

When does a spring tide occur?

a. 3rd quarter of the moon

-->  b. During Full Moon

c. 10 days after full moon

d. 1st quarter of the moon

question_image

The Neap Tide is in what orientation relative to the position of the Earth and Sun?

-->  a. Perpendicular

b. Parallel

c. Reverse

d. Diagonal

question_image

How many tides does this image show?

a. 3

b. 4

c. 5

-->  d. 2

question_image

Which moon phases cause neap tides?

a. Full Moon

b. New Moon

c. Twilight Moon

-->  d. Third quarter and First quarter

question_image

What moon phase causes a Neap tide?

a. New Moon

-->  b. Third Quarter

c. First Quarter

d. Full Moon

question_image

What kind of moon is visible during the Spring Tide?

a. earth

-->  b. new moon

c. neap tide

d. moon at third quarter

question_image

When does the Spring Tide happen?

-->  a. At new moon

b. Every day

c. At first quarter moon

d. At three quarter moon

question_image

How many kinds of tide?

a. 4

-->  b. 2

c. 1

d. 3

question_image

What phase of the moon is happening when there are neap tides?

a. new moon

b. first quarter

c. full moon

-->  d. third quarter

question_image

Which of the following affects the tides?

a. Orbit

b. Stars

c. Sun

-->  d. Moon

question_image

What makes the high and low tides?

-->  a. the phase of the moon

b. the sun

c. the sea

d. the earth

question_image

Where does the high tide occur with respect to moon?

a. Below the moon

-->  b. Facing the moon

c. Away from the moon

d. Above the moon

question_image

How many kinds of tides are there?

a. 4

-->  b. 2

c. 1

d. 3

question_image

Describe upwelling.

-->  a. It a rising of seawater, magma, or other liquid.

b. The main cause of tides is the pull of the Moons gravity on Earth.

c. A wave is the transfer of energy through matter.

d. A shock to the ocean can also send waves through water.

question_image

What are the rise and fall of sea levels caused by the combined effects of the gravitational forces exerted by the Moon and the Sun and the rotation of the Earth?

a. Energy

b. Waves

c. Moon Rays

-->  d. Tides

question_image

What affects the tide?

a. Sun

b. Earth

-->  c. Moon

d. Ocean

question_image

What pulls the earth and its oceans?

a. Mars Gravity

-->  b. Suns gravity

c. Moon Gravity

d. Earhts gravity

question_image

Towards which direction does the gravitational force of the moon cause the earth's ocean to move?

a. towards perpendicular direction of the moon

b. towards the center of the earth

c. away from the moon

-->  d. towards the moon

question_image

How many tides are presented in the two illustrations?

a. 4

b. 3

-->  c. 2

d. 1

question_image

What kind of phenomenon happens when water is pulled from one side of the earth towards the moon as shown in figure A?

-->  a. High tide

b. Nothing happens

c. I don't know

d. Low tide

question_image

What are high tides mainly caused by?

-->  a. the moon's gravity

b. the size of Jupiter

c. the sun's location

d. low tides

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This is the bulge of water on that side of Earth.

a. Nothing

b. Low tide

c. Normal water levels

-->  d. High tide

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What is the fall of sea levels caused by the combined effects of the gravitational forces exerted by the Moon and the Sun and the rotation of the Earth?

a. Ocean Waves

b. Moon Level

-->  c. Low Tide

d. High Tide

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What would happen if the moon repelled the water on the earth?

a. The tides would stay the same

b. There would be no tides

c. The tides would be equal

-->  d. The tides would swap places.

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Does the earth's rotation the same direction than the moon's?

-->  a. yes

b. it depends

c. no

d. not enough information

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In what direction is the earth's rotation?

-->  a. Anticlockwise

b. Clockwise

c. right

d. left

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Which of the following statements are true?

-->  a. The Earth and the Moon have the same direction of rotation

b. The earth does not rotate.

c. The earth and the moon have opposite rotations

d. The moon does not rotate.

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How does the moon cause tidal bulges?

a. cosmic intervention

-->  b. gravity

c. galactic influence

d. centrifugal force

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In this picture, what does the pink represent?

a. tidal bulge due to centrifugal forces

-->  b. tidal bulge due to gravity

c. moon

d. Earth

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What causes tidal bulge on the side of the earth opposite the moon?

-->  a. Centrifugal forces

b. Earth gravity

c. Moon gravity

d. Sun gravity

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What is the main cause of tides?

a. moon

-->  b. Moonts gravitational pull

c. Tidal buldge due gravity

d. Tidal buldge due to centrifugal forces

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How many trial budge are there?

-->  a. 2

b. 3

c. 4

d. 1

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What causes high tide?

-->  a. Moon's gravity on the water on the side of the earth facing the moon.

b. Moon's gravity on water on the opposite side of earth

c. Earth's gravity

d. When the earth surface is cooler

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What are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon and occur every 12 hours?

a. Waves

-->  b. Low Tides

c. High Tides

d. Rainfall

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How many kinds of tides are shown?

a. 1

b. 5

c. 3

-->  d. 2

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How many natural satellites cause the tides?

-->  a. 1

b. 4

c. 2

d. 3

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What causes tides?

-->  a. The gravitational attraction of the moon causes the oceans to bulge out in the direction of the moon.

b. The earth's orbit causes tides on earth.

c. The placement of the planets causes tides on earth.

d. The weather causes tides on earth.

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How does the moon affect the oceans?

a. Nothing happens.

b. Pushes the water away from itself.

-->  c. Pulls the water towards itself.

d. The moon has no effect.

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How many planets are depicted in the diagram?

-->  a. 1

b. 4

c. 3

d. 2

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What direction is the gravitational pull with respect to moon?

a. Away from the moon.

b. Above the moon.

-->  c. Towards the moon.

d. Below the moon.

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What tide happens on the sides of the earth perpendicular to the moon and the sun when the earth is between the sun and the moon?

a. no tide

b. high tide

-->  c. low tide

d. depends on the season

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How many celestial bodies are there in the diagram?

a. 5

b. 2

-->  c. 3

d. 4

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What drastically affects the tides?

-->  a. The moon's gravitational pull

b. Earth

c. Sun's energy

d. Sun

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What is caused by the gravitational pull of the moon?

-->  a. Low Tide

b. Orbit Movement

c. Sunlight

d. High Tide

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How many moons around the earth?

a. 5

b. 0

-->  c. 1

d. 2

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The tides are influenced by what?

a. The sun's gravitational pull to the earth.

-->  b. The moon's gravitational pull on the earth.

c. The moon's gravitational pull from the sun.

d. The earth's gravitational pull to the moon.

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Identify the direction of the earth's rotation based on the diagram?

a. downward the equator

b. to the left of the equator

-->  c. towards the right of the equator

d. upward the equator

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In what direction is the bulge in water at maximum level?

a. At the poles

b. To sun

-->  c. To moon

d. At the tropics

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What happens when water bulges away from the moon as shown in the figure?

a. Mean sea level is the same

-->  b. Low Tide

c. I don't know

d. High Tide

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Tides are caused by which force?

-->  a. Gravitational

b. Human

c. Magnetic

d. Electronic

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When the moon is dead on to the Earth, what tide is to be expected?

-->  a. High Tide

b. No Tide

c. Medium Tide

d. Low Tide

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How does the moon affect the tides?

a. Has no effect.

-->  b. Pulls the ocean towards it.

c. Depends on the position of the earth.

d. Pushes the ocean away.

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What phenomenon is observed when the earth comes in between the sun and the moon?

-->  a. Tidal Bulge

b. Tidal wave

c. Tidal force

d. Tidal blast

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For the tidal bulge to happen, where should the Earth be with respect to Sun and Moon?

a. To right of sun and moon

-->  b. In between Sun and moon

c. To left of sun and moon

d. Below sun and moon

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What is between the sun and the moon?

-->  a. Earth

b. Venus

c. Mars

d. Mercury

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Which type of tides occur during a full moon?

a. Moon tides

-->  b. Spring Tides

c. Neap tides

d. Sun tides

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How many phases are there that cause tides?

a. 3

b. 5

c. 1

-->  d. 4

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How many types of tides is shown in the illustration?

a. 4

-->  b. 2

c. 1

d. 3

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What is a tide just after a new or full moon, when there is the greatest difference between high and low water?

a. New Moon Tide

b. Low Tide

c. Neap Tide

-->  d. Spring Tide

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When the moon's phase is at new or full, what tides does it cause?

-->  a. spring tides

b. neap tides

c. abyssinal tides

d. latitudinal tides

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Identify the ocean

a. M

-->  b. Y

c. A

d. S

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Identify the equator

-->  a. X

b. C

c. F

d. V

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What tide would be shown in complete dark?

-->  a. spring tide

b. new tide

c. neap tide

d. Sun tid